Auditory-Verbal Education

Auditory-Verbal Education involves the family and works directly with children in individual, group or classroom settings.

Auditory-Verbal Education focuses on teaching listening and talking to various sized instructional groups to prepare children to enter mainstream education when they have the skills to do so successfully. A Listening and Spoken Language Educator (LSLS Cert. AVEd) teaches children with hearing loss to listen and talk exclusively though listening and spoken language instruction. The LSLS Cert. AVEd is guided by the Academy’s Ten Principles of LSLS Auditory-Verbal Education and adheres to a professional code:

A Listening and Spoken Language Educator (LSLS Cert. AVEd) teaches children with hearing loss to listen and talk exclusively though listening and spoken language instruction.

  1. Promote early diagnosis of hearing loss in infants, toddlers, and young children, followed by immediate audiologic assessment and use of appropriate state of the art hearing technology to ensure maximum benefits of auditory stimulation.
  2. Promote immediate audiologic management and development of listening and spoken language for children as their primary mode of communication.
  3. Create and maintain acoustically controlled environments that support listening and talking for the acquisition of spoken language throughout the child’s daily activities.
  4. Guide and coach parents to become effective facilitators of their child’s listening and spoken language development in all aspects of the child’s life.
  5. Provide effective teaching with families and children in settings such as homes, classrooms, therapy rooms, hospitals, or clinics.
  6. Provide focused and individualized instruction to the child through lesson plans and classroom activities while maximizing listening and spoken language.
  7. Collaborate with parents and professionals to develop goals, objectives, and strategies for achieving the natural developmental patterns of audition, speech, language, cognition, and communication.
  8. Promote each child’s ability to self-monitor spoken language through listening.
  9. Use diagnostic assessments to develop individualized objectives, to monitor progress, and to evaluate the effectiveness of the teaching activities.
  10. Promote education in regular classrooms with peers who have typical hearing, as early as possible, when the child has the skills to do so successfully.

Source: AG Bell and The AGBell Academy for Listening and Spoken Language

Additional Auditory-Verbal Education Goals

Links:

Oral Deaf Education

AG Bell